Thursday, November 29, 2012

I TRIED TO TELL HER I'M TOO YOUNG

Grandpère bakes beer bread from time to time.  His latest loaf was especially delicious, perhaps because he used a special lager given him by a friend in the recipe.  I offered a slice to my 12 year old grandson, and he told me, "I can't have that; I'm underage."  I tried to explain to him that bread with a little beer in it or food cooked with a little wine was fine for him, but I don't think I made much headway.  I didn't tell him he's probably already had food cooked with wine.

The picture does not show GP's loaf because it's nearly gone.

Image from Wikipedia.

16 comments:

  1. hehheh --just tell him the alcohol cooks out... unless, of course it doesn't!

    ReplyDelete
  2. margaret, I didn't think of that. Next time...

    ReplyDelete
  3. Replies
    1. My husband is across the street watching a football game so I can't ask him now. Please sign a name next time, Anonymous.

      Delete
  4. "Oh, can you imagine a sadder disgrace
    Than a man in the gutter with crumbs on his face."
    (From "Away With Rum - The Song Of The Temperance Union")

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Poor lad to have to contend with such a grandmother.

      Delete
  5. Sounds really good. Just a word of warning: all the alcohol doesn't necessarily cook out of things cooked with alcoholic beverages. Take a look at this link and go down to the table of how much alcohol remains in a cooked or baked dish. While I don't think that much remains in the beer bread, there will be some remaining. This is not to say that your grandson should be having any at all; a little alcohol in baked goods won't hurt him. But if anyone you know is a recovering alcoholic or is allergic to alcohol, do hesitate.

    One of my hometown's signature dishes is a cookie called a Joe Frogger. They are delicious, but could be lethal and should be sparingly served to children.

    ReplyDelete
  6. My 7-yr old daughter has recently been thru the yearly anti-drug campaign they do in the schools here, and has been hypersensitive to stuff like this. "Don't eat that, Dad! It has drugs in it!" :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David, the school anti-drug campaign could be what prompted my grandson's reply. Times change. At holiday meals, my grandparents allowed us a small glass of half wine and half water.

      Delete
    2. ... and a pint jug of moonshine.

      Delete
    3. Uh no, but the wine came from a jug...the finest of vintages bottled in a jug.

      Delete
    4. My parents gave me sips of beer and wine too. But the indoctrination of the young starts so early now and is so fierce. I can't imagine any of the kids I grew up with reacting with horror to a piece of bread. It reminds me of the time a few years ago I saw a little girl, no more than 6 or 7 at the most, in the grocery store shopping with her parents. She picked up a bag of potato chips off the shelf, looked at it intently, then threw it down, angrily exclaiming in a loud voice, "NO! I want FAT FREE!"

      Fundamentalism by any other name stinks just as bad.

      Delete
    5. My grandson seems to have learned the lesson well. I wish he was that serious about such things as studying and doing his homework.

      Everything is so serious now. Pregnancy seems like walking through a minefield. If I wanted a glass of wine, I didn't think twice about it. I knew heavy drinking would not be a good thing, ever really, but especially during pregnancy, but sensible women used common sense.

      Delete
    6. Really sensible women used a condom.

      Delete
    7. If our mothers had used condoms, you and I would not be here. Think of the loss to the world.

      That's not to say that condoms are a bad thing. In fact, they are a very good thing.

      Delete

Comment moderation is enabled. Anonymous comments are permitted so long as they are signed. Please use a name, any name, and sign your comment in order that one anonymous commenter may be distinguished from another. Thank you.