Tuesday, April 1, 2008

A Peek Into The Past - 1957



From the BBC. "And that's Panorama for today, April 1st, 1957".

UPDATE: Thanks to Lapin for the link.

14 comments:

Rural Rector said...

It was one of the best spoofs ever!

Grandmère Mimi said...

Spoof? How is it a spoof?

susan s. said...

Love it! Where does he find these things?

Grandmère Mimi said...

Here, there, and everywhere, Susan. Lapin is a gold mine for this blog.

Rural Rector said...

It is a spoof, Grandmere, because in order to protect the threatened spaghetti crops in Bosnia-Hetzegovina, the BBC Panaorama documentary pretended that they were actually filming in Italy!

Grandmère Mimi said...

Oh, I see, RR. Thanks for the explanation.

Lapinbizarre said...

He found it because he vividly remembered it from 1957 and went looking for it on the off-chance, Susan. No inspiration involved.

FranIAm said...

Now that is too too too funny!!!

And I was not quite yet born yet, but was on my way, later that year.

No wonder I love spaghetti so much.

Diane said...

hey, I can't get this at work, but when I get home.... because you know, this is my birth month (and year!)

Grandmère Mimi said...

You youngsters make me so jealous. Oh to be in my 50s again.

susan s. said...

Well, I was 12, but I didn't know much about the BBC, but I never thought spaghetti grew on trees, cause I was raised on a farm. ;-)

Grandmère Mimi said...

Susan, being raised on a farm will do that to you.

Paul said...

Ah, we learn something new every day, especially from Mimi. I wonder if I could plant it here in the high desert? I imagine probably not, alas.

Grandmère Mimi said...

Paul, I don't believe the habitat includes high desert environments.

Lapin's commentary is probably worth including here. I couldn't put it in the post, because it would give the game away.

"Panorama" was the BBC's top, dead serious weekly affairs and political discussion/interview programme in the 50's and 60's. One programme ended with this short on spaghetti production. I watched it the night it was first broadcast. It's totally deadpan, and when it was finished, Richard Dimbleby (who was also - to give you some idea of his gravity - the guy who did the commentary for the Coronation in 1953) closed the show, deadpan, with the statement "And that's Panorama for today, April 1st, 1957".