Wednesday, March 20, 2013

DRAMA AT THE ENTHRONEMENT

But perhaps the most dramatic statement about the future of the Church of England in the service to formally install the new Archbishop of Canterbury this week will be that he will be enthroned by a woman.

The Venerable Sheila Watson, the Archdeacon of Canterbury, one of the most senior female clerics in the Church of England, will perform the first of two inductions in a service to formally recognise the Most Rev Justin Welby as the 105th archbishop at the city’s cathedral on Thursday.
In a show of unity not seen since a rift over homosexuality opened up eight years ago, all of the primates of the 77-million strong Anglican Communion are expected to attend and worship under the same roof.
The Archbishop of Canterbury inducted by a woman and all 77 Primates in the same building?  God bless them every one.

15 comments:

  1. Any idea of how we can watch it?

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    1. No, Muthah, but I plan to look around and watch at least part of the ceremony if a video is available. The BBC streamed live at the time. You can see a few highlights here.

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    2. The broadcast is over now, but I expect there will be more throughout the day.

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  2. From the comments at the BBC:

    Ironic that this Sunday we'll be remembering that Jesus arrived into Jerusalem on a donkey, a symbol of humility and here we have an "enthronement" of a man in all his fine robes saying he is a servant. Actions speak louder than words.

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  3. The primates could all attend because there was no meal to share with PBKJS?

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    1. I still have not had a chance to watch because I couuld't find the video. Was there no Eucharist?

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    2. Here is the written order of service (PDF, 579 KB):

      http://www.archbishopofcanterbury.org/data/files/resources/5036/EnthronementService-v2-PRINT.PDF

      Strangely enough, no Eucharist - perhaps at Coronations and Enthronements alike, it is simply not the done thing - although what we know as the Rite I post-communion prayer follows the general intercessions towards the end of the service.

      Also very curious is the omission of any prayers for the Queen, who is of course Supreme Head on earth of the Church, and the Royal Family - I wonder if that omission is usual at an enthronement of the ABC. Also, even though the PofW and DssofC were there, representing the Queen, "God Save the Queen" was not played. But I am no expert in such matters.

      Here is a short summary clip of the service from the Telegraph, featuring a surprising and charming performance by African drummers and dancers there in mid-service; goodness, we are a worldwide Communion, aren't we?

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/9946542/Justin-Welby-enthroned-as-Archbishop-of-Canterbury.html

      And I came across one news item little noted so far: the new Abp has reached out to the gay community in the person of activist Peter Tatchell for an exchange of views:

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/9944372/Archbishop-Justin-Welbys-olive-branch-to-gay-rights-groups.html

      I wonder where that will lead.

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    3. P.S. - Here is the order of service from the enthronement of Rowan Williams in 2003. The explanatory matter at the front seems to imply that a Eucharist has not been part of the proceedings since the Reformation. Interesting.

      http://www.anglicancommunion.org/communion/abc/104/enthronementservice.pdf

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    4. A non-Eucharistic service solves the dilemma for the Primates who would not wish to "share the table" with PB Katharine, lest they catch girl cooties.

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    5. HAHAHAHAHA! You made me spew my coffee!

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    6. As one of my Facebook friends said, Peter Tatchell is a longtime warrior for LGTB equality, and he doesn't pull his punches. I don't know how the meeting will go, but I doubt there will be a quick change in the Church of England's position as a result.

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  4. No Eucharist, no Incense since the Reformation. . . all too catholic to suit, I was told.

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    1. Thanks, susan. Still, the tug of war between Anglo-Catholics and evangelicals continues.

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  5. Oh, I think it is the tug of war between the possibility of appearing to be too Roman Catholic and the newly formed Anglican Church long ago.

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    1. Henry VIII considered himself Catholic his whole life. With valid historic reasons (along with vested interests), Henry considered the English church to be Catholic but not under the authority of the Bishop of Rome.

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